Upcoming Surgery #6

Hello, all—if anyone’s still out there! My blogging has been slowly, s-l-o-w-l-y crawling toward the point of nonexistence, and I’m so sorry for being such a terrible blogger! But, life happens.

Alas, here I am. Still sometimes blogging and always still walking among the infertility trenches. But I’m beginning to climb out: I see a definite end in sight—even if that end involves bidding adieu my unproductive reproductive parts.

Blogging

In big news, part of my blogging absence is because Jake and I bought a house! Long story short, we bought  a townhouse, moved to the burbs, and are currently adjusting to the massive shock of our lives being completely uprooted.

The other reason for my blogging absence is because fertility/infertility hasn’t been much on my radar. For awhile I believe infertility became an idol in my life. It was all-consuming. As time passes, it slips further and further down my Top Ten list. Lately, at best I’m halfway interested in infertility’s role in my life. Mostly, I’m trying to move away from it, rather than digging in deeper. I want to move on.

Endometriosis Surgery

Back in October while scouring the internet for an endo specialist, I found a contender, right in my own backyard! Jake and I had a surgery consult with the doc, Dr. Lee, last week. Dr. Lee is an endometriosis wizard (wizardess?) and I think I’ll be in good hands with her for an excision surgery. She’s head of gynecology at a hospital in the city and know a lot about endo. Despite that her beside manner struck me as clinical and slightly cold, I still liked her because she plans to do a thorough endo cleanup on me.

Dr. Lee’s surgical plan is more involved than my last cleanup. Because I had a partial bowel resection during one of my prior endo surgeries, I have to meet with a colo-rectal surgeon. A pre-op bowel prep will also be involved (yech). Next week I’m having a pre-op pelvic MRI, which Dr. Lee also ordered. Then some other x-ray or specialist or… something… is involved. I basically forgot at this point what she was saying. I got hung up on the whole, “It’ll be a big surgery” part, and the rest was kind of a haze. There’s also a good chance I’ll spend a night or two in the hospital if my colon is involved again.

Surgery will be excision of endometriosis, removal of adhesions and any cysts, and cauterizing my cervix (again…) to try stopping its endless bleeding. Unlike my last two surgeries, this won’t be a daVinci robotic surgery.

Hysterectomy

Like every doctor before her, Dr. Lee reviewed my previous surgical reports and was all gloom-and-doom about my prospects for fertility and for long-term endo relief. She kept emphasizing my need to have a hysterectomy, and for the first time in many years I actually heard her out about it. Normally I tune out the docs when they start yammering on about the virtues of hysterectomy (although never the downsides… hmm), but I’m starting to wonder if maybe—just maybe—the docs are right.

It mostly comes down to quality of life: Do I want to keep a modicum of fertility, but live with ceaseless pain and bleeding? Or do I want to say goodbye to that sliver of hope/fertility, but finally have pain relief (and, dare I say, closure)?

I’ve reached a point where I can’t 100% confidently say that I want a baby badly enough to continue suffering physically and emotionally with pain from endo, pain and bleeding from a super-friable and inflamed cervix, pain from fibroids, endless ovary pain, pain from breast cysts (yeah, that’s a new thing…), painful intercourse, mega monster incapacitating cramps, and the icing on the cake: infertility. I just want it all gone… even if that means I can never be a mama. It’s a bitter pill to swallow. We’re praying for God’s leading on this. For now, I wait quietly.

 

Surgery Recap: Part 2 of 2

The other day I posted here about my experience with my most recent surgery for endometriosis. Here’s the second half of how things went:

For background, I was diagnosed with severe stage four endometriosis during my two surgeries that preceded this month’s surgery (these were surgeries # 3 and 4). In both of those prior surgeries, the operating doctors each separately told me that I had the worse case of endo they’d ever seen. That’s not exactly bragging rights… who wants to hear that they have the worst case of [fill-in-the-blank medical thing]? During surgery #3 my severe endo, along with several chocolate cysts, were all removed. Thirteen months later, during surgery #4, all the endo had returned, and then some. Organs that weren’t even adjacent to one another were adhered together. Bad stuff.

Surgery #4 took place five years ago, which is the longest I’ve gone between surgeries. Since then, I have been TTC and have experienced near-constant ovary pain. Jake and I have not achieved any [natural] pregnancies in the five and a half years that we’ve been trying for a baby, nor has my ovarian pain ceased in that time. Then, for several months in 2016, I was having unexplained intermenstrual bleeding. Sex has also been quite painful for me these last few months, mainly around my cervix.


This time around, during surgery #5, Dr. Din and I were prepared to find lots of endometrial implants (i.e. endometriosis), some burst cysts, multiple adhesions, and maybe even some uterine polyps or fibroids thrown in for good measure that might explain my mystery bleeding. But not so!

Here’s what Dr. Din did NOT find:

  • No burst (or whole) cysts
  • No fibroids
  • No polyps
  • No endometrial implants

Take a look at that last one again: no endometrial implants. That means I had NO ENDOMETRIOSIS!!!!!!!!!!!!! None. Dr. Din said that possibly there’s some microscopic endometriosis going on, but nothing severe enough that it’s visible.

How does one go from severe stage four, rapidly recurring endometriosis to no endometriosis? There’s just not an explanation. The endo should’ve returned with a vengeance in these five years, just like it returned with a vengeance in the thirteen months between surgeries #3 and #4. My only explanation is prayer. I cannot be convinced otherwise. I believe that God has kept my endometriosis from returning, and I am so very thankful.

Here’s what Dr. Din did find:

  • Pelvic Adhesive Disease: Adhesions had stuck my colon to my uterus. The colo-rectal surgeon who was en suite during my procedure removed these adhesions. Dr  Din explained that my pain during sex was as follows: Penetration was hitting my cervix, which was then pushing on the adhesions, which were then pushing against my uterus and colon, causing a big messy ball of pain. Yikes! This also explains why I’ve had painful bowel movements for, like, a year.
  • Ovarian Adhesions:  My ovary was encased on all sides by adhesions. Dr. Din described it as being wrapped in layers of Saran wrap. These were all removed.
  • Fallopian Tube Blockage: Here’s the biggie: My fallopian tube (I only have one tube and one ovary) was completely blocked by adhesions where the tube meets my ovary (distal); it was not blocked where the tube meets my uterus (proximal). This explains why I haven’t gotten pregnant: my body was literally unable to become pregnant. Although I’ve been somewhat regularly ovulating, the egg couldn’t penetrate through the dense adhesions. Meaning the egg couldn’t even get into my fallopian tube for a chance at fertilization. This was a total surprise, and there’s no telling how long it’s been blocked. Dr. Din used a procedure called chromotubation during my surgery—which is like an HSG, only better—to verify that I have no further blockages. My 2015 HSG showed that my tube was clear, but Dr. Din chalked that up to a false positive. I’m not so sure about that, and plan to investigate it further.

At least as of this moment, I am fully fertile! That is what I choose to focus on. There is absolutely no reason why I cannot get pregnant on my own for the time being. Yes, there is a very distinct medical possibility that the adhesions/blockages will return in time. Will it be a few months? or a year? No telling. Removal of distal fallopian tube blockage unfortunately has a pretty poor success rate when it comes to keeping the tube open in the long run. But I’m believing for the best; God is on my side! And in the meantime, I’m studying up on different methods and success rates of FT blockage removal.

Besides, it’s not like I can’t have another surgery in the future. In all seriousness. Part of me has already begun prepping for that possibility. I will do whatever it takes to keep my remaining reproductive organs inside my body where they belong.


As far as recovery goes, I have no complaints. I had surgery on a Wednesday and went back to work on Monday. The five days in between I took it very easy.

Pain has been minimal. Sometimes I feel a deep, organ-y pain in my uterus and tube that no medication can touch. And my ovary still hurts exactly like it did before; I’m hoping that will go away once I’ve healed more.

I ended up with four incisions instead of the three that Dr. Din promised; three of these incisions were made over my existing scars, and the fourth is new. The new incision is above where my belly button used to be. Dr. Din took a peek under the hood at my umbilical area and reported back to me that the umbilical mesh which I had installed during my 2008 surgery (surgery #2) is holding up well. I’ve been having umbilical pain the past few days—probably from that area being messed with—but it’s quieting down now. One of my incisions is a bit weepy and sometimes bleeds, so I’ve been keeping it covered lately. Otherwise, all’s been well.

Here’s some pics of the progress I’ve made, from days 1 – 6:

doc1

Oh, and I finally pooped today! That only took a week. Ugh. Surgery really backs up the pipes. It still hurts some to go, but that’s because human colons don’t much enjoy being handled and prodded. My pooping pain shouldn’t last long. Aren’t you so pleased that you read down this far?! If WordPress had emojis, I’d absolutely insert a poop emoji right about now.

On surgery day I forgot to remind Dr. Din to remove the epidermal inclusion cysts on one of my scars. Grrrr… That might be something a dermatologist can take care of for me in the future, so no real worries.


My post-op appointment isn’t for another six days. Hopefully I’ll take home some gory surgical pics from the appointment to share with you all.

Peace.

 

 

 

 

Surgery Recap: Part 1 of 2

nurse-159224_960_720

It’s been five days since my latest surgery and I’m feeling excellent! By far this has been the easiest surgical recovery I’ve ever had. I’m so immensely grateful to God for a less painful, less complicated, less messy recovery and to the stellar medical team that assisted.

This was my first “true” laparoscopy: my first laparoscopy (surgery #1) turned into a laparotomy. My second laparoscopy (surgery #4) was both a laparoscopy and a surprise episiotomy. Now that I’ve had a “true” lap, I find that recovery is not nearly as intense as being cut open. Such a relief!

Since I’ve been doing so many bullet-style posts lately, I thought I’d keep up tradition today. It’s kind of a long read, so I broke it up into two posts. This first part is about my surgery experience. The second part will be about my surgical treatment and diagnoses.

Here’s the recap of part 1:

Hospital: 

I had to be at the hospital at 6:00 a.m. on surgery day. The hospital is an hour drive from my house. I also had to shower with special antimicrobial soap both the night before surgery and the morning of surgery, so I was up at 3:30 a.m. to begin the festivities. Plus I wanted to do one last sweep of my house to make sure it was tidy and that all necessities were in reach of my bed, where I planned to convalesce for the next several days.

Jake had nursing clinicals the day of my surgery and wasn’t able to stay with me for the long haul. Fortunately, his clinical site was in the same town as the hospital, so he drove me to the hospital. He stayed stayed for an hour before having to leave for clinicals. Jake was dressed in his nursing scrubs, so I was accompanied to the hospital by a tall, good looking male almost-nurse! There was some initial confusion about that, because the hospital staff thought that Jake was an employee! Once that misunderstanding was straightened out, all the nurses went completely gaga over Jake. They kept fussing about him being a male almost-nurse and giving him nursing tips and advice. It made his day.

Pre-Surgery: 

Dr. Din’s surgical orders were written as though I’d be spending the night in the hospital. My previous two surgeries (surgeries # 3 and # 4) I spent between 2 to 3 nights in the hospital, so I had packed an overnight bag this time just in case. Dr. Din was simply being overly cautious, and all the nurses were surprised to see that I had overnight orders for a same-day surgery.

And I had such great nurses! They were simply wonderful and professional! If you read my previous post, I talked about how getting stuck with the hand IV needle is one of the worst things about surgery to me. When I asked my nurse, Dawn, for an arm IV, she agreed… until she realized that I was having robotic surgery. Apparently patients can only have a hand IV when the doctor is operating with “the robot” (that’s what all the nurses called it: either “the robot” or “robo-lap”). Dawn was very understanding about my concerns of hand pain. She investigated my veins and told me that I have “teeny tiny veins, no hand fat, and thick vein walls” which meant that I was a “tough stick.” These are all her words. Dawn warmed my hand in a heated blanket for 15 minutes before getting my IV ready, which made a huge difference in helping to plump up my vein! The IV needle hurt, of course, but it was the best hand stick I’ve ever had.  I was very pleased. Unlike the terrible blood draw from last week (which looked like this a full week later)…:

armbruise

…my hand IV had minimal bruising. Here’s what it looked like mere hours after surgery:

handstickiv_edited

The anesthesiologist also let me pop a Maxalt pre-surgery (migraine medication). I’d had a migraine for three days pre-op, and the medical teams was concerned that anesthesia would make my migraine worse. I was more than delighted to be able to finally have some relief.

All the usual suspects stopped in my room pre-surgery to ask me routine questions and do their respective prep work: anesthesiologist, nurse assistants, OR nurse, and Dr. Din himself. Twenty minutes before my scheduled surgery time, Nurse Dawn slipped a healthy dose of Versed (a sedation medication that is similar to Xanax, but on mega steroids) into my IV. The Versed combined with my Maxalt had me sooooo chill: I would’ve agreed to any procedures at that point! I suppose that’s why they had me sign all my consents before giving me any meds.

The Operating Room: 

The OR room was the standard spaceship-like, high-tech operating room. Instead of the cold, hard, metal table that I was anticipating, the nurses had me scoot onto a surgical table that was covered in eggshell foam. In my medicated state, it looked like the exact same kind of eggshell foam that you’d keep on your mattress at home for extra padding. It was so cozy and soft, and I totally didn’t mind.

The last thing I remember was Dr. Din standing bedside patting me on the shoulder. My lack of sleep—combined with the Versed and Maxalt—knocked me out cold before they even administered the anesthesia. I sure made the anesthesiologist’s job easy! From there, it was go time.

Post-Surgery: 

My post-surgery wake up was typical: as in, I didn’t want to get up. Come to think of it, I’m actually like this pretty much every morning in real life too… I kept falling back asleep each time the nurses shook me. To my great annoyance, the nurses continued to shake me and tell me to wake up until I finally, reluctantly listened.

Upon waking up I was in a decent amount of pain, but not nearly as much pain as I’m used to experiencing post-anesthesia. I felt a strong, deeply painful urge to pee and rather weepily asked for a bedpan. Of course I couldn’t actually go pee once they brought the bedpan. The bladder is the one organ that takes the longest to “wake up” after surgery, so it was a figment of my imagination that I needed to pee at all.

I stayed in the recovery room for three hours. A new nurse periodically checked my stats. I begged her for ice chips. She brought me a delicious cup of ice chips, but, maddeningly, would only give me one chip at at time! Then she’d set the cup down—just out of my reach—and disappear for fifteen minutes. Those long minutes she was gone I would give that cup the stare down and will it closer to me with the power of my (still-medicated) mind. In my post-anesthesia fog, I concocted asinine methods of how I could somehow move the ice chip cup toward me… except I was just too groggy to actually try them. Every fifteen minutes the nurse reappeared to give me one single ice chip (so agonizing—I wanted the whole cup) before she left again. I remember feeling so very sad about my ice chips. She was not my favorite nurse.

After recovery, I was transferred back to a room. “Room” is a loose term: I think it was actually the pre-surg area all over again, and each ‘room’ was only separated with curtains. Jake was able to come see me here. My recovery nurse, Gerri, also fell in love with Jake in his scrubs! They talked shop over my head most of the time.

Gerri was kinder than my previous nurse: not only did she let me have A WHOLE ENTIRE CUP of ice chips, she also gave me two cranberry juices and packets of crackers. I liked Gerri very much. She more than made up for the Ice Chip Nazi.

Medications: 

My post-op meds consisted of Toradol for pain (which is a joke of a narcotic painkiller IMO), Zofran for nausea, and Dilaudid for pain, and some other medication that I can’t recall.

I specifically requested Dilaudid instead of Morphine. Morphine doesn’t really touch my pain, and it gives me incredible nausea. I’ve learned that the hard way. Dilaudid, even though it’s five times stronger than Morphine, manages my pain well and doesn’t make me nauseous. To my relief, the docs were very accommodating of my request for Dilaudid.

I was sent home with a bottle of Percocet, in the lowest dosage available, which I initially thought was very uncool of Dr. Din.  I’ve ended up not needing as many of them as I usually do during a recovery, so it all worked out in the end.

Next Up: 

Next up in Part 2 is what was found and diagnosed in surgery, plus my recovery.

I said all that to say this: I’m not completely sure why I typed this first part of the surgery out. It was a very standard and unexciting surgery. *But* if this info might one day help someone else who is about to have her first laparoscopy and give her an idea of what to expect, then it’s worth these 1,525 words after all.

Stay tuned!

 

Operation: Operation = Success!

Just a really quick update for now, since my typing skills are currently crap (hello, pain meds!) and it’s hard to keep coherent thoughts in order.

I had my laparoscopy/D&C/hysteroscopy/biopsy yesterday. Everything went very, very well. Like, stellar. Superb. Dr. Din found exactly what we’d expected to find, and then some that we weren’t expecting.

I’ll write an actual post soon, when I’m not loaded on pain killers and after the anesthesia’s completely worn off.

In the meantime I’m recovering at home, where Jake’s been taking excellent care of me. Unfortunately, he’s in nursing clinical rotation right now and can’t take any time off during the day to stay with me. My sister is with me today instead to help me out. Our house has loads of stairs and I can’t manage them or care for the pets in my current state, so I’m very grateful for her being here with me.

 

Here’s where I’m at right now. Don’t worry: it looks worse than it actually feels!

Thank you all for your prayers and well wishes. By far this has been my best surgery yet, and I’m so thankful to God for showing up in a big way.

Update to follow.

 

 

 

 

Pre-Op: Check (plus a Blogging Milestone)

doctor-161345_960_720

This morning I went to the hospital for my pre-op formalities for my upcoming laparoscopy. It was all very routine: blood work drawn, insurance paperwork reviewed and copay for the surgery itself paid, plus a brief meeting with a nurse to go over the other detail that I won’t bore you with.

The first phlebotomist who drew my blood did a terrible job! She stuck me twice, both times with no luck. She was fumbling around for so long that my arm was turning purple from the tourniquet. Now I’m no newbie to having blood drawn and it normally doesn’t faze me, but I found myself getting frustrated with her. Fortunately, a more experienced phlebotomist stepped in and saved the day by finishing the job! My arm is quite sore from the first phlebotomist’s missteps, but I figured no biggie. But then the hospital called me two hours after I’d left to let me know they’d “forgotten” to draw an extra vial of blood that was needed, and would I mind coming back in for another “quick draw” (which is an hour drive each way for me)? Yes, I do mind! But I’ve little choice in the matter. So back I go tomorrow! Hmmph.

Only 6 more days until surgery day! *Gulp.* My nerves are starting to amp up a bit… Not a lot, just the usual amount of butterflies that happen when reality starts to sink in and time draws closer to an event.

Here’s what I’m not looking forward to:

  • Anesthesia. I’m just not a fan of those moments right before going under: The cold metal table beneath my thin hospital gown. Staring up at the bright, spaceship-like lights of a sterile operating room. The deep burn of the anesthesia as it courses through my veins. But it’ll be okay in the end. Because God’s got this! Couldn’t be in better hands than His!
  • The initial wake up. The pain that strikes when the nurses awaken me from a surgery is like nothing else I know to describe. It starts as a dim awareness of just having had surgery, followed by nervousness that the doc had to slice me open after all, then concludes with the actual surgical site pain itself and intense craving for ice chips.
  • IV. Okay, maybe this sounds crazy, but in my opinion, the IV that the nurse oh-so-sadistically plunges into my hand pre-surgery hurts almost as much as the surgery itself! I plan to ask that my IV be inserted into my arm instead. I had an arm IV during my 2012 surgery (after three—yes three—failed attempts into my hand. Oy.) and it was so much comfier! Want proof? This is what my hand looked like a full week after the IV was removed from my hand following my 2015 egg retrieval. It also took that nurse multiple attempts to correctly insert the huge, scary needle into my hand, and each merciless jab of her needle had me writhing in pain:
20150924_091200_edited
Ouch!

What I am looking forward to:

  • Pain relief (well, after I’ve healed from the surgery pain!) from years of near-constant ovarian and uterine pain. Goodbye, relentless pain and damaging adhesions. Time to go away. And stay away!
  • A restored fertility window of six months to a year, which gives me the same chances of conception as any woman my age who doesn’t have endometriosis. Yippee!
  • The end of intermenstrual bleeds. Umm, yeah. Won’t miss those.

 

Finally, I got a happy little notice from WordPress last week that The Endo Zone has reached 100 followers! (And, since then, up to 103.) A huge shout out and ginormous Thank You to all 103 of you lovely, awesome people for following along! Much love <3.

Would You Like a Hysteroscopy With That?

operating-room-848496_960_720

Not having to be conscious during unpleasant medical procedures makes me deliciously happy. Why, yes, I would in fact enjoy a nice dose of anesthesia while having my lady bits poked and prodded with frightening medical instruments, thankyouverymuch! So, in that sense, it’s a dream come true for my pain threshold. Confused? Read on: this is a quicky post.

I don’t actually expect my readers of this lil’ blog (all 98 of you awesome people…still shocked that nearly 100 people find this stuff remotely interesting. Mwuah!) to remember what I’m talking about. I’m kind of an infrequent blogger, although one my new year’s resolutions is to fix that.

So, quick recap: I was supposed to have a combination hysteroscopy/D&C/uterine biopsy with my RE, Dr. C, earlier this month to investigate my last six months of continuous unexplained bleeding. After that procedure, I was supposed to have a laparoscopy cleanup surgery for endometriosis with my other doctor, Dr. Din, in early February. Pleasant ways to start off a new year, eh?  j/k. I’m actually grateful to be in the hands of such good doctors and to have God’s blessings of finances to pay for this medical care.

After I’d already scheduled my hysteroscopy/D&C/biopsy with his clinic, Dr. C suggested that, instead, Dr. Din could do these procedures while he was already operating on me… Which came down to a real “duh” moment for me: Why would I want to have two unpleasant procedures spaced out over the course of a month when I could just have them both done at once (and—bonus— while not having to feel the actual procedures while they were happening!)?

I saw Dr. Din again last week. He was extremely cool about adding these extras to my surgery.

We also scheduled my surgery while I was at his office. I picked the first available date. It all goes down on Wednesday, February 1, 2017:

  • Laparoscopy for endometriosis removal. This includes checking my bowels, abdomen, uterus, ovary, fallopian tube, cervix, pelvic cavity, and bladder for endo and/or adhesions.
  • Hysteropscopy to see why the heck I keep on bleeding and bleeding (including as I type this on cycle day 24) like a crazy woman between periods.
  • D&C to empty out whatever mystery intruders might have taken up residency in my uterus, possibly causing the bleeding.
  • Uterine biopsy to make sure nothing more sinister is lurking in my cells.
  • Correction of one of my previous surgical scars (post to follow) that looks….well…not like it should.

I’m pretty chill about the surgery itself. This is not my first rodeo, so I’m fully aware of what to expect afterward.

It seems like I’ve been writing on this blog for months now about having another surgery. Literally, months. You must all be bored to tears reading about something that never seems to actually happen! It’s a great feeling to finally have a set date, rather than just a looming possibility hanging in perpetuity in the general future.

Next up: all about surgical scars. I promise it will be nice and gory.

Peace. 🙂

 

The Long-Awaited Surgical Consult

surgery

Guys, seriously. It actually happened! After like a zillion false starts and so much stupidity, I fina-freak-ing-ly had my surgical consult for endometriosis cleanup! That only took six months. But, praise God, He made a way this time!

I returned to see my latest surgery prospect, Dr. Din*, two days ago. I’m glad I gave him a second chance after the epic fail that was my original consult. Dr. Din ended up being extremely thorough and knowledgeable, and patiently answered all 1,000 of my questions. I’m so pleased that my first impression about his practice was changed for the better.

This time around there were no other patients in the waiting room, nor were there any ridiculous delays. I waited maybe 10 minutes in reception and an additional 15 minutes or so in the exam room; I think that’s pretty standard for a doctor’s office.

As I was hoping, I didn’t have to change into a gown or have an exam, or any other such nonsense. I remained in my regular clothes and Dr. Din didn’t press me to have an exam. I believe when you meet a doctor for the first time that it’s always better to be fully dressed. When you’re wearing only a thin paper gown and feeling virtually naked, it automatically puts all authority and power in the patient/doctor relationship in the doctor’s court. So I appreciated being able to keep my pants on.

Here’s how it went down, bullet style

  • Dr. Din reviewed the ginormous packet of records I’d brought. Specifically, he took time to read my last two post-op reports.
  • After reading my records, he looked up at me and said, “Boy. You’ve got a real mess going on in there.” This didn’t faze me or upset me at all like it used to. He’s certainly not the first (or second, or even third) doctor to say that to me: I already know my endo is way bad. Like, if they counted past Stage 4, I’d probably be a Stage 6.
  • Dr. Din was concerned about my colon. I’d forgotten this, but apparently in surgery #4—but not in previous surgeries—I had significant endo on my colon and bowel/rectum area (forgive me if these are not in the same neighborhood of the body. My anatomy knowledge is sparse).
    • Option A: Because of the colon thing, Dr. Din gave me the option of referring me to a reproductive oncologist (an “RO”) to do my surgery; ROs apparently frequently work within the colon area. My experience from a previous surgery with an RO is that they’re quite scissor-happy. I do not want another laparotomy. Period. I do not like Option A.
    • Option B. Dr. Din often work in tandem with a colorectal surgeon. This means that, during my surgery, Dr. Din will do all the work (well, the Da Vinci robot will, actually) as far as removing endo, but a colorectal surgeon will be the surgical suite too. If Dr. Din sees endo on my colon/bowel/rectum areas, his colorectal colleague will take over the Da Vinci robot to remove endo from those areas. I am a fan of Option B.
  • My endo will be fully excised. The only time Dr. Din would burn it away is if there were “very small spots” (his words) that would be too small to bother excising. I’m okay with this.
  • Dr. Din is buddies with Dr. C (my RE). Apparently the two of them frequently exchange patients: Dr. C does IVF, but not obstetrics. Dr. Din does not do IVF, but he’s an OB who often follows post-IVF pregnancies. I was pleased to know that, between the two docs, I’d be in good hands.
  • Dr. Din examined the myriad of surgical scars on my abdomen (seriously, there’s so many). He pointed out where he would make incisions over top of my existing scars. I was happy to know that I’m only adding 1 tiny new scar to the collection.

I am to send Dr. Din a copy of the report following my upcoming hysteroscopy. If he has any questions about it—or about my history in general—he will touch base with Dr. C. In the meantime, Dr. Din promised to thoroughly review my plethora of records.

After the hysteroscopy, I’ll schedule a second appointment with Dr. Din. I imagine he’ll go over my procedure, order some blood tests, and schedule my pre-op stuff and the surgery itself. Time frame = end of January/early February.

Here’s to pain relief, to finally freeing my ovary from a tangle of adhesions, and being one step closer to restoring my fertility for natural TTC!

 

 

*Nope, not his real name; just a pseudonym to keep up my privacy in the blog world.